The 41st season may be coming to a close but there are still plenty of chances to experience the magic of the Festival during closing weekend. Don’t miss your chance to see these world-class performances in the Holy City through June 11.

Photo by Nigel Bewley

Hailed as “comedic brilliance” by Charleston City PaperThe Table tells the tale of Moses by Moses. This cardboard-headed, Bunraku-style puppet may be tiny but his powerful story and cantankerous attitude take up the entire stage. His story delights with contemporary humor and historical references. Performances through June 10—CLICK HERE for tickets and information.


Photo by Christophe Raynaud De Lage

The astounding, gravity-defying physical theater troupe Compagnie XY demonstrates incredible feats with Il n’est pas encore minuit. The performance will leave you simultaneously bewildered and wanting to jump up to try it yourself. With no harnesses or ropes, this troupe tests their physical limits collaboratively; teamwork versus gravity. Performances through June 11—CLICK HERE for tickets and information.


Photo by Matthew Thompson

Waiting for Godot is a Samuel Beckett classic directed by Tony-award winner Garry Hynes. This engaging piece of theater almost demands that audiences practice mindfulness as the plot is right in the title: while two characters wait for the mysterious Godot to appear they ponder life and their purpose in it all. The simple set design is fully explored by the character’s existential musings and wanderings. Performances through June 11—CLICK HERE for tickets and information.


Photo by Yi-Chun Wu

W H A L E is an impulsive, highly energetic exploration of the human pursuit of love and being loved by Gallim Dance company. This intimate, suggestive, and partially nude dance dialogue—inspired by Ohad Naharin’s Gaga technique—takes audiences on a relatable journey through the expectations, anxiety, and forgiveness surrounding love. Look forward to a sensually suggestive performance so engaging and wholly human its dialogue will spark conversation long after the curtain falls. Performances through June 10—CLICK HERE for tickets and information.


Photo by Maria Grazia

Whether they’re slight or more forthright, we all have some preconceived opinions about others. Hillel Kogan’s We Love Arabs confronts the prejudices between an Arab-Israeli and an Israeli-Jew through the use of subtle humor, Gaga movements, and hummus. Yes, we said hummus. Performances through June 10—CLICK HERE for tickets and information.

Photo at top by Yi-Chun Wu